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Version: 2.0.0-beta.15

MDX and React

Using JSX in Markdown

Docusaurus has built-in support for MDX v1, which allows you to write JSX within your Markdown files and render them as React components.

note

While Docusaurus parses both .md and .mdx files using MDX, some of the syntaxes are treated slightly differently by third-party tools. For the most accurate parsing and better editor support, we recommend using the .mdx extension for files containing MDX syntax.

To define any custom component within an MDX file, you have to export it.

export const Highlight = ({children, color}) => (
<span
style={{
backgroundColor: color,
borderRadius: '2px',
color: '#fff',
padding: '0.2rem',
}}>
{children}
</span>
);

<Highlight color="#25c2a0">Docusaurus green</Highlight> and <Highlight color="#1877F2">Facebook blue</Highlight> are my favorite colors.

I can write **Markdown** alongside my _JSX_!

Notice how it renders both the markup from your React component and the Markdown syntax:

http://localhost:3000
Docusaurus green and Facebook blue are my favorite colors.

I can write Markdown alongside my JSX!

MDX is JSX

Since all doc files are parsed using MDX, anything that looks like HTML is actually JSX. Therefore, if you need to inline-style a component, follow JSX flavor and provide style objects.

/* Instead of this: */
<span style="background-color: red">Foo</span>
/* Use this: */
<span style={{backgroundColor: 'red'}}>Foo</span>

This behavior is different from Docusaurus 1. See also Migrating from v1 to v2.

In addition, MDX is not 100% compatible with CommonMark. Use the MDX playground to ensure that your syntax is valid MDX.

Importing components

You can also import your own components defined in other files or third-party components installed via npm.

<!-- Docusaurus theme component -->
import TOCInline from '@theme/TOCInline';
<!-- External component -->
import Button from '@mui/material/Button';
<!-- Custom component -->
import BrowserWindow from '@site/src/components/BrowserWindow';
tip

The @site alias points to your website's directory, usually where the docusaurus.config.js file is. Using an alias instead of relative paths ('../../src/components/BrowserWindow') saves you from updating import paths when moving files around, or when versioning docs and translating.

While declaring components within Markdown is very convenient for simple cases, it becomes hard to maintain because of limited editor support, risks of parsing errors, and low reusability. Use a separate .js file when your component involves complex JS logic:

src/components/Highlight.js
export default function Highlight({children, color}) {
return (
<span
style={{
backgroundColor: color,
borderRadius: '2px',
color: '#fff',
padding: '0.2rem',
}}>
{children}
</span>
);
}
markdown-file.mdx
import Highlight from '@site/src/components/Highlight';

<Highlight color="#25c2a0">Docusaurus green</Highlight>

Check out the MDX docs to see what other fancy stuff you can do with MDX.

Markdown and JSX interoperability

Docusaurus v2 is using MDX v1, which has a lot of known cases where the content fails to be correctly parsed as Markdown. Use the MDX playground to ensure that your syntax is valid MDX.

Samples of parsing failures

A paragraph starting with a JSX tag will be seen entirely as a JSX string:

<span style={{color: 'red'}}>Highlighted text</span> but afterwards _Markdown_ **doesn't work**
http://localhost:3000
Highlighted text but afterwards _Markdown_ **doesn't work**

Markdown within a JSX tag never works:

<span style={{color: 'red'}}>**Bold doesn't work**</span>
http://localhost:3000
**Bold doesn't work**

Text immediately below a JSX tag will be seen as JSX text:

<div style={{color: 'red'}}>
**Bold still doesn't work**
</div>
http://localhost:3000
**Bold still doesn't work**

Markdown text indented by four spaces will be seen as a code block:

<div style={{color: 'red'}}>

You may think I'm just some text...

</div>
http://localhost:3000
You may think I'm just some text...

Importing code snippets

You can not only import a file containing a component definition, but also import any code file as raw text, and then insert it in a code block, thanks to Webpack raw-loader. In order to use raw-loader, you first need to install it in your project:

npm install --save raw-loader

Now you can import code snippets from another file as it is:

myMarkdownFile.mdx
import CodeBlock from '@theme/CodeBlock';
import MyComponentSource from '!!raw-loader!./myComponent';

<CodeBlock className="language-jsx">{MyComponentSource}</CodeBlock>
http://localhost:3000
/**
* Copyright (c) Facebook, Inc. and its affiliates.
*
* This source code is licensed under the MIT license found in the
* LICENSE file in the root directory of this source tree.
*/

import React, {useState} from 'react';

export default function MyComponent() {
const [bool, setBool] = useState(false);
return (
<div>
<p>MyComponent rendered !</p>
<p>bool={bool ? 'true' : 'false'}</p>
<p>
<button onClick={() => setBool((b) => !b)}>toggle bool</button>
</p>
</div>
);
}

See using code blocks in JSX for more details of the <CodeBlock> component.

note

You have to use <CodeBlock> rather than the Markdown triple-backtick ```, because the latter will ship out any of its content as-is, but you want to interpolate the imported text here.

warning

This feature is experimental and might be subject to breaking API changes in the future.

Importing Markdown

You can use Markdown files as components and import them elsewhere, either in Markdown files or in React pages.

By convention, using the _ filename prefix will not create any doc page and means the markdown file is a "partial", to be imported by other files.

_markdown-partial-example.mdx
<span>Hello {props.name}</span>

This is text some content from `_markdown-partial-example.mdx`.
someOtherDoc.mdx
import PartialExample from './_markdown-partial-example.mdx';

<PartialExample name="Sebastien" />;
http://localhost:3000
Hello Sebastien

This is text some content from _markdown-partial-example.md.


This way, you can reuse content among multiple pages and avoid duplicating materials.

caution

The table of contents does not currently contain the imported Markdown headings. This is a technical limitation that we are trying to solve (issue).

Available exports

Within the MDX page, the following variables are available as globals:

  • frontMatter: the front matter as a record of string keys and values;
  • toc: the table of contents, as a tree of headings. See also Inline TOC for a more concrete use-case.
  • contentTitle: the Markdown title, which is the first h1 heading in the Markdown text. It's undefined if there isn't one (e.g. title specified in the front matter).
import TOCInline from '@theme/TOCInline';
import CodeBlock from '@theme/CodeBlock';

The table of contents for this page, serialized:

<CodeBlock className="language-json">{JSON.stringify(toc, null, 2)}</CodeBlock>

The front matter of this page:

<ul>
{Object.entries(frontMatter).map(([key, value]) => <li key={key}><b>{key}</b>: {value}</li>)}
</ul>

<p>The title of this page is: <b>{contentTitle}</b></p>
http://localhost:3000

The table of contents for this page, serialized:

[
{
"value": "Using JSX in Markdown",
"id": "using-jsx-in-markdown",
"children": [
{
"value": "Importing components",
"id": "importing-components",
"children": [],
"level": 3
},
{
"value": "Markdown and JSX interoperability",
"id": "markdown-and-jsx-interoperability",
"children": [],
"level": 3
}
],
"level": 2
},
{
"value": "Importing code snippets",
"id": "importing-code-snippets",
"children": [],
"level": 2
},
{
"value": "Importing Markdown",
"id": "importing-markdown",
"children": [],
"level": 2
},
{
"value": "Available exports",
"id": "available-exports",
"children": [],
"level": 2
}
]

The front matter of this page:

  • id: react
  • title: MDX and React
  • description: Using the power of React in Docusaurus Markdown documents, thanks to MDX
  • slug: /markdown-features/react

The title of this page is: MDX and React